RATIONAL EMOTIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy (REBT) was developed by Dr. Albert Ellis in 1955. It has since flourished and spawned a variety of other cognitive-behaviour therapies. REBT's effectiveness, short-term nature, and low cost are major reasons for its popularity.

REBT's comprehensive approach works best for individuals desiring a scientific, present-focused, and active treatment for coping with life's difficulties, rather than one which is mystical, historical, and largely passive.  REBT focuses on the dynamic of cause and effect

REBT is based on a few simple principles that have profound implications regarding life change:

  1. You are responsible for your own emotions and actions,

  2. Your harmful emotions and dysfunctional behaviours are the product of your irrational thinking,

  3. You can learn more realistic views and, with practice, make them a part of you,

  4. A Reality-Based Perspective facilitates deeper acceptance of self and greater fulfilment of life experiences.

CBT

GESTALT PSYCHOTHERAPY

TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS

FREUDIAN PSYCHOANALYSIS

JUNGIAN PSYCHOANALYSIS

RELATE COUNSELLING

DREAMWORK

SATIRIAN MODELLING

REBT distinguishes clearly between two very different types of difficulties: practical problems and emotional problems. Your flawed behaviour, unfair treatment of you by others, and undesirable situations, represent practical problems. Regrettably, your innate human tendency is to upset yourself about these practical problems, thereby unnecessarily creating a second order of problems--emotional suffering.

CLINICAL HYPNOSIS

NEURO-LINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING

TIMELINE THERAPY

The treatment of a clients problems evolve through three stages of therapy.  These are known as RIA stages; Realization, Investigation/Interpretation and Actualization.

LIFE COACHING

CONSULTATIONS AND CONTACT INFO

Stage 1:   Identify your "musts." Once an individual accepts that they distort their own emotions and actions, then the key to solution lies in determining precisely how distortion takes place. The culprit usually lies in one of the three core "musts:"

   
   
  • "Must" # 1 (a demand on yourself): "I MUST do well and get approval, or else I'm worthless." This demand causes anxiety, depression, and lack of motivation and assertiveness.

  • "Must" # 2 (a demand on others): "You MUST treat me reasonably, considerately, and lovingly, or else you're no good." This "must" leads to resentment, hostility, and violence.

  • "Must" # 3 (a demand on situations): "Life MUST be fair, easy, and hassle-free, or else it's awful." This thinking is associated with hopelessness, procrastination, and addictions.

   

Stage 2:   Dispute your "musts." The only way you can ever remain disturbed about adversity is by vigorously and persistently agreeing with one of these three "musts."   Thus, once you've identified them,  relentlessly question and challenge the demands you impose upon yourself, others and the world you inhabit.

Begin by asking yourself: "What's the evidence for my `must?' " "How is it true?" "Where's it etched in stone?"  By doing this you will see that there is often no evidence or insubstantial evidence to support your beliefs - you can then begin to adopt a more evidence-based approach to what are most often simply practical problems.

   

Stage 3:   Application of change.  Decide on a new approach and apply this to the world of thoughts, feelings and actions - this time looking for evidence and accepting what is presented to you.

By identifying cause and effect and supporting this with evidence that is presented to you, you will steadily integrate new behavioural approaches that produce lasting positive consequences, and be an active player is shaping your own destiny.